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Orcae

Introduction

ORCAE is an online genome annotation resource offering users the necessary tools and information to validate and correct gene annotations. The system is build on the wiki philosophy, all modifications to a certain gene are stored and can be found back in the annotation history of that gene. To be able to modify genes however you will need to have a user account. Anonymous users can browse the public genomes but don't have editing rights.
To get started select one of the genomes from the list below or log in directly to go to the restricted access section.
If you would like to apply for a user account, so that you are able to edit records, send a mail to explaining your request.

How to cite this resource

Sterck, L., Billiau, K., Abeel, T., Rouzé, P., Van de Peer, Y.
ORCAE: online resource for community annotation of eukaryotes. Nat. Methods (2012) 9, 1041.

Please note that although care was taken to make this website as much as possible cross-browser compatible, it will work best with FireFox > 3.5, Safari and Google Chrome.

Public Genomes

Ostreococcus tauri

This is the updated genome. The genome size of Ostreococcus tauri is the smallest of all known eukaryotes. The nuclear genome is about 12 Mb, fragmented into 20 chromosomes, ranging in size from 120 to 1500 Kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed Ostreococcus tauri within the Prasinophyceae, an early branch of the Chlorophyta (green algae).

An improved genome of the model marine alga Ostreococcus tauri unfolds by assessing Illumina de novo assemblies.
Blanc-Mathieu R, Verhelst B, Derelle E, Rombauts S, Bouget FY, Carré I, Château A, Eyre-Walker A, Grimsley N, Moreau H, Piégu B, Rivals E, Schackwitz W, Van de Peer Y, Piganeau G1.
BMC Genomics. 2014 Dec 13;15:1103.
doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-1103.

Ostreococcus tauri

The genome size of Ostreococcus tauri is the smallest of all known eukaryotes. The nuclear genome is about 12 Mb, fragmented into 20 chromosomes, ranging in size from 120 to 1500 Kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed Ostreococcus tauri within the Prasinophyceae, an early branch of the Chlorophyta (green algae).

Genome analysis of the smallest free-living eukaryote Ostreococcus tauri unveils many unique features.
Derelle E1, Ferraz C, Rombauts S, Rouzé P, Worden AZ, Robbens S, Partensky F, Degroeve S, Echeynié S, Cooke R, Saeys Y, Wuyts J, Jabbari K, Bowler C, Panaud O, Piégu B, Ball SG, Ral JP, Bouget FY, Piganeau G, De Baets B, Picard A, Delseny M, Demaille J, Van de Peer Y, Moreau H.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Aug 1;103(31):11647-52.

Tetranychus urticae

In spider-mites known genome size varies from ~723Mbp in Tetragnatha elongata to ~5.5 Gbp in Habronattus decorus suggesting poliploidisation of the genome. So far no chelicerate genome has been sequenced. The annotation of the Tetranychus urticae genome, representing a major plant pest, will be important for plant science and agriculture. Toward this goal we're developing the spider mite Tetranychus urticae as a plant-eating arthropod model. This project capitalizes on multidisciplinary collaboration between our lab, the laboratory of Dr. Grbic (with expertise in developmental biology and pest control who is leading the sequencing project of the T. urticae genome) and the Joint Genome Institute.

The genome of Tetranychus urticae reveals herbivorous pest adaptations.
Grbić M1, Van Leeuwen T, Clark RM, Rombauts S, Rouzé P, Grbić V, Osborne EJ, Dermauw W, Ngoc PC, Ortego F, Hernández-Crespo P, Diaz I, Martinez M, Navajas M, Sucena É, Magalhães S, Nagy L, Pace RM, Djuranović S, Smagghe G, Iga M, Christiaens O, Veenstra JA, Ewer J, Villalobos RM, Hutter JL, Hudson SD, Velez M, Yi SV, Zeng J, Pires-daSilva A, Roch F, Cazaux M, Navarro M, Zhurov V, Acevedo G, Bjelica A, Fawcett JA, Bonnet E, Martens C, Baele G, Wissler L, Sanchez-Rodriguez A, Tirry L, Blais C, Demeestere K, Henz SR, Gregory TR, Mathieu J, Verdon L, Farinelli L, Schmutz J, Lindquist E, Feyereisen R, Van de Peer Y.
Nature. 2011 Nov 23;479(7374):487-92. doi: 10.1038/nature10640.
Restricted Genomes

Please note that although care was taken to make this website as much as possible cross-browser compatible, it will work best with FireFox > 3.5, Safari and Google Chrome.